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20121201
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of the internet and it more than anywhere else. new york, london, tokyo. there are interesting outliers. places like ashford, virginia and another not far from dulles airport. you asked the engineers where the v that is, they would take new york, los angeles, and ashford. theyere the cetnernter is, would say new york, los angeles, hford.wn for -- asked for i you might say the loading dock of a shopping mall are very generic. deliberately so. they try to hide inside when you tried id.. a try to hide them in plain sight. others have operators -- what operators like to call a science fiction movie. that is deliberate. it are modeled after science fiction in order to appeal to the network engineers that are deciding where to put their network connections and where to connect to other networks. when you walk in, it is a bit like walking into a machine. the buildings are incredibly loud and cold from the air- conditioners that keep the machines cool. you cannot see the ceiling. there are usually cages around. big steel cages about half the size of a hotel room. each belongs to a network. that is wher
is an investigative reporter with the "new york times." mr. glanz, what is an internet datacenter? >> it is a place where all the information you sent out from your communicatocomputer or mobe goes into process and storage. >> how big are these centers? >> there actually colossal. their colossal in the amount of electricity they use. some use as much electricity as a medium-sized town. it is a very secretive industry. they tend to be hiding in plain sight. littlees you'll see diesel generators on the side. those are backup power supplies. and it is a data center. >> were those located at the road they're all over the place. they're in high rises in cities, in greenfield sites out in suburban areas, there tucked away in the back of offices. they are the way that most commerce takes place now. everyone has to have one. there are concentrations of the in the country. northern virginia, silicon valley. they're everywhere at this point. >> who runs them? >> a variety of players. companies that need these for their regular business owns some of these data centers, everything from walmart to microsoft. th
to this point. >> host: very quickly, konrad motyka is a special agent based in new york city. he is currently assigned to the counterintelligence division, asian organized crime narcotics task force and a former member of the s.w.a.t team. gregory nojeim is at the center for democracy and technology, where he directs they are freedom security and technology. he spent several years at the american civil liberties union as the associate or, chief legislative counsel at the washington office. brendan sasso with the hill, next area discussion, please. >> host: i want to ask briefly of competing civil investigations. this is something agent trained to touch briefly on. i'm wondering if the federal trade commission or the securities and exchange commission want to get information from an e-mail provider. they're investigating google i want to know whether the company is engaged in unethical business is. does this legislation impede that investigation? >> guest: let me explain why there might be better examples. google acts as a provider of communications service and is a provider of communications
in subscription unless you're an incumbent news organization like new york times or something. most of it is just who lands here, for what purpose. i get paid if you purpose the click. -- if you push the click. i don't want get paid if you don't push the click. i don't really care -- i hate to say it this way, but at some level don't really care what you like what's there or not as long as you do the things that cause the monetary machine to turn over. and that's just a very different approach to the consumer than we're required to have, and i think we're a culture that's more conservative about that than those cultures. you know, mark zuckerberg who, you know, one of the country's great pioneers, i think he's made no secret. many of them come from a philosophical standpoint that information was meant to be free, it was meant to be available to all people all the time, and it's one of the reasons they're in this neverending, iterative battle with government forces about where the line is. because i think they're very comfortable that there is a very thin line. um, i understand the argument, but i
're an organization like "new york times." most of it is just who lands here for what purpose. i get paid if you push the click. i don't get paid if you don't push the click. i don't care whether you like it -- i hate to say it but at some level don't care whether you like what there is or not as long as you do the things that cause the monetary machine to turn over. and that's a very different approach to the consumer than we're required to have, and i think we're a culture that is more conservative. about that. than most cultures. mark zuckerberg, one of the great pioneers, many of them fromol a philosophical standpoint that information was men to be free and they're in this never-ending battle with governmental forces about where the line is, because i think they're very comfort able with the very thin line. i understand the argue. but i don't know that's going to comport with moe people. >> host: michael paul, lynn brought up micropurchasing and one of the hit shows is downton abbey. if people want to purchase that on amazon or netflix, they can, and they can watch the series and they don't have
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5